Nail Polish Shelf Life and When It’s Time To Say Goodbye

Nail Polish Shelf Life and When It’s Time To Say Goodbye

Nail Polish Shelf Life and When It’s Time To Say Goodbye

Your nail polish shelf life depends on expiration dates and proper storage techniques. However, there comes the point when it’s time to say goodbye to the old nail polish and toss it away for good. Read this guide to understand when your polish reaches its lifespan.

The Shelf Life of Nail Polish

Regular nail polish can last between 12 to 24 months if you properly store the bottle in a cool and dark place and let it sit upright. In addition, gel nail polish can last between 24 to 36 months. However, the product’s PAO (period after opening) indicates the shelf life of the particular polish.

Why Does Polish Go Bad?

Typically, nail polish can go bad if you don’t use the product for an extended period. The compounds in the polish will settle and separate, making it “un-useable.” Even with a quick shake, the polish will become hard to blend.

Signs It’s Time To Throw Away Your Polish

Regardless of the nail polish shelf life, it’s important to keep an eye on the product’s texture, smell, and overall appearance. If you’re not sure when it’s time to say goodbye to the old polish, look out for these signs:

  • You notice an unpleasant or pungent smell.
  • Polish has a “crumbly” texture. This indicates that the solvents in the polish evaporated.
  • The consistency is too thick or too stringy compared to the first time you opened the product.
  • You can’t open the bottle. Nail polish can dry and create a “seal” around the bottle, making it permanently stuck.

When Not To Toss Your Polish

Although there are clear signs that you need to throw away nail polish, there is an exception! If you break a bottle, you can salvage the leftover polish by placing it in an empty bottle. And you can choose Nail Company Wholesale Supply as your empty nail polish bottle supplier! Don’t toss away a perfectly good polish when you can transfer it into another container.

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